ICD-11 PTSD & Complex PTSD

ICD-11  PTSD & Complex PTSD

PTSS, CPTSS and BPS – A latent class analysis
Published: 15 September 2014

There has long been debate about whether Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Complex PTSD) is distinct from Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) comorbid with PTSD. Part of the difficulty in this evaluation has been the lack of clear and consistent characterization of Complex PTSD. The World Health Organization (WHO) Working Group on the Classification of Stress-Related Disorders has proposed the inclusion of Complex PTSD as a new diagnosis related to but separate from PTSD (Maercker et al., 2013). Both of these disorders are viewed as distinct and separate from BPD. An emerging and accumulating empirical literature is demonstrating consistent and clear differences between ICD-11 PTSD and Complex PTSD. In addition, it is important to determine the construct validity of Complex PTSD as empirically distinct from BPD particularly among those with a trauma history. This investigation evaluated whether ICD-11 Complex PTSD could be distinguished from DSM-IV BPD in a treatment-seeking population of women with childhood abuse.
ICD-11_CPTSD
The WHO proposed that the development of ICD-11 be guided by the principle of clinical utility. Characteristics of clinical utility include the organization of disorders that are consistent with clinicians’ mental health taxonomies, that contain a limited number of symptoms so that they can be easily recalled and used in the field, and that are based on distinctions important for management and treatment (Reed, 2010). The distinction between ICD-11 PTSD and Complex PTSD are consistent with these guidelines (see Cloitre, Garvert, Brewin, Bryant, & Maercker, 2013; Maercker et al., 2013). For example, ICD-11 PTSD is construed as a fear-based disorder and symptoms are limited to and consistent with fear reactions and consequent avoidance and hypervigilence. In contrast, Complex PTSD has been described as typically associated with chronic and repeated traumas and includes not only the symptoms of PTSD but also disturbances in self-organization reflected in emotion regulation, self-concept and relational difficulties (see Cloitre et al., 2013) a symptom profile that has been demonstrated as associated with prolonged trauma (Briere & Rickards, 2007).

Three studies have found evidence supporting the validity of the ICD-11 PTSD versus Complex PTSD distinction (see Table 1 for description of the diagnoses). Recently, in order to evaluate whether PTSD and Complex PTSD could be empirically distinguished from each other, Cloitre and colleagues (2013) performed a latent profile analysis (LPA) on assessment data from 302 treatment-seeking individuals with diverse trauma histories, ranging from single events (e.g., 9/11 attacks) to sustained exposures (e.g., childhood or adult physical and/or sexual abuse). The results were consistent with the ICD-11 formulation for Complex PTSD, with the best fitting LPA model delineating three classes of individuals: (1) a Complex PTSD class, with high levels of both PTSD symptoms as well as disturbances in self-organization related to affect regulation problems, negative self-concept, and relational difficulties; (2) a PTSD class, with high levels of PTSD symptoms but relatively low on the disturbances in self-organization that define Complex PTSD; and (3) a class relatively low on symptoms of both PTSD and Complex PTSD. Notably, these identified classes were identical when including an additional 86 participants with BPD, providing further support for the stability of the identified classes. Cloitre et al. (2013) also found that chronic trauma was more predictive of Complex PTSD than PTSD and that Complex PTSD resulted in significantly greater functional impairment than PTSD.

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